WealthRise® Model

Our Program

Advancing Wealth Justice

The most ripe contexts for financial trauma to be transmitted are through policy, education, culture, and families. Since financial trauma has the greatest influence on Black women and girls' wealth, it is imperative that we transform each ecosystems’ transmission centers. As such, our WealthRise® model partners with policymakers, education systems, local cultural institutions, and families.

Culture

Our cultural institutions are how community ecosystems retain and reenact historical financial trauma. As such, we identify these institutions and build capacity for these entities to recognize and disrupt the transmission of financial trauma.




Policy

Our local and state policymaking partners commit to capacity-building programming, trainings, and events that teach legislative aides and the like to incorporate understandings of wealth justice and financial trauma in their work. Equally, we host community activations to codify the ways local political institutions can help the broader community metabolize the financial trauma that has been thwarted onto the community.

Education

Our education partners commit to deliver our programming to their students up to daily through our Equiddieᵀᴹ platform. Equally, we conduct capacity-building trainings and infrastructure-building for education system leaders to successfully reduce or eliminate the impact of financial trauma.

Families

We host regular programs for families to learn, heal and build wealth.





Our Program

The WealthRise® Model in Action

BlackFem’s WealthRise® Model is not linear but rather a whole-community system that intervenes and engages with all the stakeholders and "centers" (i.e. entities) where financial trauma can be perpetrated. We focus on the following pillars and programmatic actions:

the wealthrise® model in action

Culture

Our cultural institutions are how community ecosystems retain and reenact historical financial trauma. As such, it is important to identify the major local institutions that influence the culture of the community and build capacity for these entities to recognize and disrupt the transmission of financial trauma. Often these major cultural hubs are local businesses, churches, and community centers. We offer capacity-building and community infrastructure-building to teach how to transform these institutions into healing centers instead of (unintentional) trauma centers. We can measure the effect of this using Chloe McKenzie's measurement tool and research that she's published on.

the wealthrise® model in action

Families

Families are the second-leading institutions that are a ripe context for transmission or perpetration of financial trauma. BlackFem hosts regular programming and supports the launch of other programs and initiatives for parents to transform their homes into centers for learning and healing. Participants demonstrate both an increase in material wealth, material safety, and wealth-building capability through greater access to assets, resources to fund those assets, and the strategies to heal financial trauma.

the wealthrise® model in action

Policy

Institutions that enact policies are often the ripest context for financial trauma to be perpetrated and/or transmitted. Our partner cities commit to capacity-building programming, trainings, and events that teach legislative aides and the like to incorporate understandings of wealth justice and financial trauma in their work. Equally, we host community activations for policymakers and the local community to codify the ways local political institutions can help the broader community metabolize the financial trauma that has been thwarted onto the community. It is common we see significant shifts in policy framing, political debate around economic policies, and community engagement and pressure regarding economic change.

the wealthrise® model in action

Education

Our K-12 partners commit to deliver our programming to their students up to daily through our Equiddieᵀᴹ platform. Young adults in the higher education space are most in need of programming and strategies to maximize their wealth-building capability. We focus on developing both economic and extraeconomic teachings to help students build material safety and then sustained material wealth. K-12 and Higher education institutional policies and messages also perpetrate and transmit financial trauma. We conduct capacity-building trainings and infrastructure-building for education institutions to successfully reduce or eliminate the impact of this common phenomena with students. Students will improve their material wealth by getting assets like bank accounts and brokerage accounts that are often funded through our programs and the college or university. Equally, we measure their increased wealth-building capability through our extraeconomic measures based on how the institution transforms its offerings, policies, and messaging.